Mosaic Tech Talk

Here’s a little peek at some tools and studio features that I’ve recently found essential:

 Tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

I use this “self-healing” mat for cutting the fiberglass mesh at the edge of the tile tesserae when I have finished a panel.

As you can see, my utility knife is what I use to cut the mesh.  The technique of adhering the mosaic design to sections of mesh, then adhering the whole group of sections onto its final substrate or location allows me to create in my studio.

So, how does the tile get cut into those tesserae?

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

My ‘nipper buddy’ makes the handles of my tile nipper much longer.

Various tile nippers make some of the cuts.  I don’t know what this device is called that gives me a mechanical advantage, but I call it a nipper buddy.

Here’s my favorite:

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

The Apollo Ring Saw cuts curvy shapes out of high-fired ceramic tile.

Saves my hands from tendonitis, as does the nipper buddy, but this ring saw saves tile, too, by making each cut precise.

Would you like to see my view?

Lynn Bridge's mosaic studio, Glencliff Art Studio, in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

My view from my ring saw station on my porch.

Back to my tools in the studio:

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

Dishpans contain my tile tesserae.

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

My studio easel (for painting) lies down almost flat when I want it to.

My painting easel turns into a mosaic easel.  I tape my design to a heavy board which rests on the easel.  Next, I tape clear plastic over the design.  Then, I tape fiberglass mesh over the plastic, and now I am ready to adhere the tile tesserae over the design.

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

My easel stands in a range of upright positions.

This is how I use my easel when I’m adhering the tesserae.  I only lay the mosaic flat when I am leaving the mortar to cure for awhile.  I don’t want the tesserae to slide downward.

Here is how I mix my mortar (it is about the consistency of peanut butter.):

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

I mix mortar by tablespoons in a ceramic cup.

Here is my supervisor:

cat storage devices in Lynn Bridge's mosaic studio, Glencliff Art Studio, in Austin, TExas

My cat-towers are indispensable for storing cats during mosaic procedures.

And what would I do without my Miele Capricorn vacuum cleaner?!?!?  It has a sealed dust collection bag inside a sealed chamber, so no particulates escape its clutches.  Very important when I’m vacuuming glass, mortar, and tile dust which are unhealthy to breathe.

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

My sine qua non- the Miele Capricorn vacuum cleaner from Long’s on South Congress Avenue.

 

tools used by Lynn Bridge in her mosaic art studio, Glencliff Art Studio in Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

Did I mention how completely useful these cat storage devices are to my work?

Notice the unfocused gaze and the lolling activity atop the tower.  This only slows me down a little as she goes into petting position as I pass by.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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